China To Have Space Station By 2022.

After an aggressive series of space programs, the Chinese government has set another ambitious goal: a space station of their own.

The space station will use modules that they have already placed in orbit and have manned for a short time, 15 days.  However, the data collected has proven valuable enough to move forward.

The government acknowledges that China must still master launching cargo and fuel using space freighters and recycling air and water for extended manned missions.  No small feat in the short amount of time that they have set for themselves.  A failure in any one of those systems will spell disaster.

The Chinese still lag pretty far behind the current crop of space nations, but are trying to catch up quickly.  We will have to wait and see if they can successfully accomplish what others have done before.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

China’s 1st Moon Rover Is In Orbit Around The Moon.

Well, while I was dealing with plumbing issues and other things not working, China was busy in space.

Five days after launch, China’s Chang’e 3 spacecraft reached lunar orbit Friday, ready for landing at the Bay of Rainbows.

Onboard the lunar lander is a six-wheeled robotic rover ready to take China’s first unmanned trip on the Moon.

After lowering its altitude later this week, the lander will touch down in the Bay of Rainbows, a lava plain on the moon scheduled for some time Dec. 14.

The rover, Yutu or “jade rabbit,” will drive off the landing platform a few hours after landing.

China’s lunar program is focused on robotic missions for now, with military-run human space program is focused on a space station.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Visitors to the Heavenly Palace

Three Chinese astronauts have successfully docked their Shenzhou-10 capsule with the Tiangong-1 space laboratory (“Heavenly Palace”) for a 15 day stay in in orbit. 

Chinese astronauts (from left) Wang Yaping, mission commander Nie Haisheng and Zhang Xiaoguang gesture as they prepare to board the Shenzhou-10 spacecraft in Jiuquan, China, on Tuesday.

The crew, pictured above, also includes Wang Yaping, China’s second female astronaut.  She will be practicing docking maneuvers between the Shenzhou-10 and theTiangong-1.  Wang is the China’s first teacher in space, in an analog to Christa McAuliffe.

These are the last astronauts to stay in the Heavenly Palace because it is running short on material to sustain it’s mission. Luckily, a new Heavenly Palace, the Tiangong-2, is being built to replace the current lab in the near future.  Interestingly, the Chinese are not abandoning the current Heavenly Palace, but intend to use it as a giant warehouse in the sky to help store material for their planned space station.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California. As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Spot the Space Station

NASA has announced a new service to help people see the International Space Station (ISS) when it passes overhead. “Spot the Station” will send an email or text message to anyone that signs up for the service.  A message will be sent a few hours before the space station is visible.

When the space station is visible — typically at dawn and dusk — it is the brightest object in the night sky, other than the moon. On a clear night, the station is visible as a fast moving point of light, similar in size and brightness to the planet Venus. “Spot the Station” users will have the options to receive alerts about morning, evening or both types of sightings.

Sometimes, however, the ISS passes overhead during the day.

 

The International Space Station’s trajectory passes over more than 90 percent of Earth’s population. The service is designed to only notify users of passes that are high enough in the sky to be easily visible over trees, buildings and other objects on the horizon. NASA’s Johnson Space Center calculates the sighting information several times a week for more than 4,600 locations worldwide, all of which are available on “Spot the Station.”

With a small telescope or binoculars you should be able to see the space station.

WARNING…DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN, POINT A TELESCOPE AT THE SUN, LOOK THROUGH BINOCULARS AT THE SUN UNLESS YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND HAVE THE PROPER PROTECTION.  YOU WILL GO BLIND!

Click to sign up for “Spot the Station.”

For more information about the International Space Station and a full list of sightings, click here.

If you, or someone you know, need advice on copyrights, patents or trademarks, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman

China’s First Woman Astronaut

Liu Yang, is China’s first woman in space.  She and the other two astronauts are on a mission to dock with an orbiting station, the latest step in an ambitious program to go to the moon and on to Mars.

The Shenzhou-9 capsule lifted off smoothly at the Jiuquan launch centre, set in the arid wastes of north China’s Gansu province, commanded by an air force colonel, Jing Haipeng, 46. All systems functioned normally and, just over 10 minutes later, it opened its solar panels and entered orbit.

Liu Yang, 33, and two male crew members – mission commander and veteran astronaut Jing Haipeng, 45, and newcomer Liu Wang, 43 – docked the spacecraft with a prototype space lab launched last year in a key step toward building a permanent space station. All three are experienced pilots and officers in the Chinese air force.

Two of the astronauts will live and work inside the module to test its life-support systems while the third will remain in the capsule to deal with any unexpected emergencies.

The trio are among a breed of “superbeings”, said state media, a cadre of astronauts who will one day be able to endure the 56 million km journey to Mars.

Their training was run by the military but can be pieced together from Chinese specialist magazines and army journals. Physical and psychological resilience are put to extreme test in the so-called “58 ladders” that Chinese astronauts must “climb” to qualify for national fame – and there are no concessions to women.

The Tiangong 1 module, now orbiting at 343 kilometers (213 miles) above Earth, is only a prototype.  Plans call for it to be replaced by a larger permanent space station due for completion around 2020.

That station is to weigh about 60 tons, slightly smaller than NASA’s Skylab of the 1970s and about one-sixth the size of the 16-nation International Space Station.

China has only limited cooperation in space with other nations and its exclusion from the ISS, largely on objections from the United States, was one of the key spurs for it to pursue an independent space program 20 years ago.

China first launched a man into space in 2003 followed by a two-man mission in 2005 and a three-man trip in 2008 that featured the country’s first space walk.

In November 2011, the unmanned Shenzhou 8 successfully docked twice with Tiangong 1 by remote control.

Shenzhou 9 is to first dock with the module by remote control, then separate and dock again manually in order to fully test the reliability of the system. The astronauts are to conduct medical tests and various other experiments before returning to Earth after more than 10 days. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/China Foto Press/AP Photo)

China's First Spacewoman Liu Yang

China's first female astronaut Liu Yang, bottom, waves during a sending off ceremony as she departs for the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

China's first female astronaut Liu Yang, waves during a sending off ceremony before she departs for the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

China's first female astronaut Liu Yang, waves during a sending off ceremony before she departs for the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

China’s first female astronaut Liu Yang, waves during a sending off ceremony before she departs for the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012. China will send its first woman and two other astronauts into space Saturday to work on a temporary space station for about a week, in a key step toward becoming only the third nation to set up a permanent base in orbit. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

China's astronauts from left., Liu Yang, Jing Haipeng and Liu Wang wave and walk before a giant portrait of China's first astronaut Yang Liwei, as they depart for the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

China’s astronauts from left., Liu Yang, Jing Haipeng and Liu Wang wave and walk before a giant portrait of China’s first astronaut Yang Liwei, as they depart for the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launches from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launches from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launches from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

A child uses a pair of binoculars to view the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket before it launches from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012

Spectators gather to watch the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China

Spectators gather to watch the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launch from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China, Saturday, June 16, 2012. (Photo by Ng Han Guan/AP Photo)

A New Age in Space Exploration

Congratulations to the folks over at SpaceX for their successful l Falcon 9 rocket launch.  Later, the spacecraft will launch a Dragon spacecraft to orbit and (hopefully) dock with the International Space Station (ISS).  SpaceX will be the first commercial company in history to attempt to send a spacecraft to the ISS.  Can the images from 2001: A Space Odessy where a Pan American World Airways operated Orion III spacecraft with inflight service transports people to space on a regular basis be far away.  I think Richard Branson already has plans.

It is a great time for new frontiers.  I look forward to it.  Do you, or do you think that only governments should fly the friendly space skys?

– Ex astris, scientia –