Let’s Buy A Space Station!

I was just reading over on David Reneke’s excellent site about how the powers that be are going to let the International Space Station (ISS) crash into the ocean after they retire it in 2020.

This seems like a waste to me.  Currently, there are at least three viable commercial space programs in operation.

The Dragon has already conducted several successful missions to the ISS, and the other programs are not far behind.

You would think that someone like Richard Branson, would be in talks already about taking the ISS off the hands of the nations that don’t want it anymore.  It should be a bargain!

Just think, the lucky new owner wouldn’t have to spend billions of dollars to put 924,739 pounds (419,455 kilograms) of material into orbit.

With a little refurb using some finer appointments from the yachting industry, the owner could have the first space hotel at a bargain basement price!

How many of you would pay to spend money on that vacation!  (me me me me me me me me me me me me).

Capitalism at its best.  The costs for commercial space flights would decrease as demand increased additional hotel/cassino’s could be built.  The world would be forced to do something about all the space junk floating in orbit.  A win/win situation if I ever saw one.

I think we need to start a petition or a kickstarter project for us to own our very own space station.  By 2020, we should have enough pledges to buy if no one else steps forward.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +.  If you need help with any patent, trademark, or copyright issue, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

Norman

 

 

Spot the Space Station

NASA has announced a new service to help people see the International Space Station (ISS) when it passes overhead. “Spot the Station” will send an email or text message to anyone that signs up for the service.  A message will be sent a few hours before the space station is visible.

When the space station is visible — typically at dawn and dusk — it is the brightest object in the night sky, other than the moon. On a clear night, the station is visible as a fast moving point of light, similar in size and brightness to the planet Venus. “Spot the Station” users will have the options to receive alerts about morning, evening or both types of sightings.

Sometimes, however, the ISS passes overhead during the day.

 

The International Space Station’s trajectory passes over more than 90 percent of Earth’s population. The service is designed to only notify users of passes that are high enough in the sky to be easily visible over trees, buildings and other objects on the horizon. NASA’s Johnson Space Center calculates the sighting information several times a week for more than 4,600 locations worldwide, all of which are available on “Spot the Station.”

With a small telescope or binoculars you should be able to see the space station.

WARNING…DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN, POINT A TELESCOPE AT THE SUN, LOOK THROUGH BINOCULARS AT THE SUN UNLESS YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND HAVE THE PROPER PROTECTION.  YOU WILL GO BLIND!

Click to sign up for “Spot the Station.”

For more information about the International Space Station and a full list of sightings, click here.

If you, or someone you know, need advice on copyrights, patents or trademarks, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Voting From Space.

The two NASA astronauts, commander Sunita Williams and flight engineer Kevin Ford, onboard the International Space Station (ISS) could vote in today’s election while orbiting the Earth once every 90 minutes.  However, both astronauts voted via absentee ballot before taking off for the ISS from Russia.

Voting From Space 

This system was made possible by a 1997 bill passed by Texas legislators (nearly all NASA astronauts live in or around Houston). It was first used that same year by David Wolf, who happened to be aboard Russia’s Mir space station at the time.

Wolf voted in a local election in 1997.

Leroy Chiao was the first American to vote in a presidential election from space while commanding the ISS Expedition 10 mission in 2004.

No matter the distance from home, you too, should exercise your right to vote if you are in any democracy or republic.

For us in America this is a special time.  As a veteran, and the upcoming holiday honoring veterans and their families, I urge you to get out and vote.  Many men and women gave everything to give you that right.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman