Ode to Herschel’s Images

Yesterday, I reported that the Herschel Space Observatory was on its last legs.  Today, I present you some images taken by Herschel during its lifetime.  Enjoy.

Massive star formation in the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC)

Herschel targets galactic black-hole jet.

Betelgeuse’s enigmatic circumstellar envelope and bow shock.

Almost 800 spectroscopic redshifts obtained for HerMES galaxies.

Herschel displays how massive stars sculpt their surroundings.

The iconic M16 ‘Eagle Nebula’ in new light!

 

Fomalhaut as imaged by Herschel!

Well, if I have done everything right clicking on any of the images above will take you to the page on the European Space Agency’s Hershel web site that has all of the images and more information about each one.  If that doesn’t work click here and it will take you to the page.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +.  If you need help with any patent, trademark, or copyright issue, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

Norman

 

 

 

Can You Help Find Holes?

In the Clouds of dust in the Milky Way of course.  The difficult and complex shapes make it too difficult for computers to analyze images from NASA’s infrared Spitzer Space Telescope.

So far, the human eye is the only thing available that can spot these holes and astronomers are once again turning to citizen scientists for help.


“We were surprised to find that some of these dark clouds were simply not there, appearing dark in Herschel’s images as well,” Derek Ward-Thompson, director of the Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Astrophysics in England, said in a statement. Finding these unexpected holes is tricky. “The problem is that clouds of interstellar dust don’t come in handy easy-to-recognise shapes,” he added. “The images are too messy for computers to analyze, and there are too many for us to go through ourselves.”

Astronomers who use the Hershel space telescope teamed up with citizen science portal Zooniverse to make images of our galaxy available online for the public to comb through.

Please note that the site to help is not on the Zooninverse projects page, but is located at http://www.milkywayproject.org/clouds.  A tutorial shows how to tell the difference between a hole and a cloud.  The volunteer decides if an image is a glowing cloud, a hole in the sky or something in between.  The site gives examples of each.
The Milky Way Project, which has already created astronomy’s largest catalog of star-forming bubbles since its inception two years ago.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman