Ode to Herschel’s Images

Yesterday, I reported that the Herschel Space Observatory was on its last legs.  Today, I present you some images taken by Herschel during its lifetime.  Enjoy.

Massive star formation in the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC)

Herschel targets galactic black-hole jet.

Betelgeuse’s enigmatic circumstellar envelope and bow shock.

Almost 800 spectroscopic redshifts obtained for HerMES galaxies.

Herschel displays how massive stars sculpt their surroundings.

The iconic M16 ‘Eagle Nebula’ in new light!

 

Fomalhaut as imaged by Herschel!

Well, if I have done everything right clicking on any of the images above will take you to the page on the European Space Agency’s Hershel web site that has all of the images and more information about each one.  If that doesn’t work click here and it will take you to the page.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +.  If you need help with any patent, trademark, or copyright issue, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

Norman

 

 

 

I’ll Have Mine With Butter Please.

Mmmmmmm, lobster.  Add a little butter and life is good.  Actually, you may need a lot of butter for this lobster.

'Cosmic Lobster' Caught in Amazing Space Photo

Lobster nebula, not lobster newburg.  But still, life might be good in the vast star forming region (NGC 6357) about 8,000 light years from Earth in the southern constellation Scorpius.  The nebula has massive, hot, blue stars that dot the wisps of gas and dust in the stellar nursery, much like the Pleadies cluster visible in the Northern hemisphere.

The image above, released by the European Southern Observatory on Wednesday, was created using infrared data from ESO’s Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), at the Paranal Observatory in Chile.

“Infrared observations can reveal features that cannot be seen in visible light pictures, for example because an object is too cold, obscured by thick dust or is very distant, meaning that its light has been stretched toward the red end of the spectrum by the expansion of the universe,” the ESO wrote in a statement.

The ESO said that images like this one taken by VISTA will help scientists map our galaxy’s structure and explain how it was formed.

Still, it looks like a lot of butter is needed.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +.  If you need help with any patent, trademark, or copyright issue, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

Norman

Howdy Neighbor!

European astronomers yesterday announced the discovery of an Earth size planet orbiting one of the stars in Alpha Centauri.  Alpha Centauri is the nearest star system to the Earth, and the famed retirement home in the original Star Trek series of Zefram Cochrane, inventor of the warp drive.  The planet was detected using the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planetary Search (HARPS) instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Alpha Centauri is one of the brightest stars in the southern sky and is only 1.3 parsecs or 4.3 light-years away.  The Alpha Centauri system is a tertiary star system.  That is, there are two Sun-like stars (Alpha Centauri A and B), and a smaller red star (Proxima Centauri).

The HARPS instrument detected planets by plotting tiny wobbles in a stars motion caused by the passage of a planet orbiting around the star.  The wobble effect of the planet in Alpha Centauri is minute, causing the star to move back and forth no more than 51 centimetres per second (1.8 km/hour), about the speed of a baby crawling. This is the highest precision ever achieved using this method.

“This is the first planet with a mass similar to Earth ever found around a star like the Sun. Its orbit is very close to its star and it must be much too hot for life as we know it,” adds Stéphane Udry (Geneva Observatory), a co-author of the paper and member of the team, “but it may well be just one planet in a system of several. Our other HARPS results, and new findings from Kepler, both show clearly that the majority of low-mass planets are found in such systems.”

“This result represents a major step towards the detection of a twin Earth in the immediate vicinity of the Sun. We live in exciting times!” concludes Xavier Dumusque.

If you need help with a patent, copyright or trademark matter, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation at nvantreeck@usip.com or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman

 

Inaugural Issue of the International Law Journal on Space Law

My friend and colleague Dr. Rita M. Lauria is the Editor in Chief of a new epublication for the Los Angeles County Bar Associations International Law Section.  This International Law Journal will focus in on the impact of various policies regarding, among other things, space law.

 

 

 

 

You can view the current issue here (http://www.lacba.org/showpage.cfm?pageid=14288).  The next issue of the journal will focus on Cyber Law.

My previous blog posts on space law caught the eye of Rita, and we began a conversation about our mutually shared interest (gotta love social media).  I was more than happy to 1) let everyone know about the journal; and 2) read the articles.  I know most of you may find it boring legal stuff, but there are some issues for everyone on the planet that need to be worked out.  With China, Japan, India, the EU and the U.S. all putting objects into space, agreements need to be worked out and problems solved.

I post another article later this week on the liability the European Space Agency is facing for a failing satellite they launched.

If you publish ebooks, emagazines, or print books, magazines or newspapers and need to protect your work, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation at nvantreeck@usip.com or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Curious(ity) Sounds

By now we have all seen the self portrait pictures of the Curiosity rover.

But now we can even hear how it sounds.  During the seven minutes of terror during the landing on Aug. 5,
Curiosity sent back status and health updates.  The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Mars Express orbiter recorded some of this chatter, and now we can hear what Curiosity had to say.

Sort of.

The sounds from Curiosity’s radio signals have been processed to shift them to frequencies we human can hear.
“This provides a faithful reproduction of the ‘sound’ of the NASA mission’s arrival at Mars and its seven-minute plunge to the Red Planet’s surface,” Mars Express researchers wrote.

The recording compresses 20 minutes of Curiosity signals into a 19-second clip.

If you have a recording of your own that needs protection, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation at nvantreeck@usip.com or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

– Ex astris, scientia –