The Partial Eclipse…Partially Captured.

Now that I have just about recovered from a great Nightfall, it is time to start posting the fruits of my sleepless days and nights in Borrego Springs.

Eclipse

As I arrived on Thursday afternoon, I was just in time to catch some of the partial eclipse.  However, I was just arriving and it takes about an hour to set everything up.  Luckily, I have been preparing for this day and I whipped out my camera bag and attached my already set up solar capture lens train consisting of a manual 200mm lens, with and ND 1100 filter on the front and a Kenko 2X tele-extender on the back to my Canon EOS-M camera.  A quick tripod setup and I managed to focus (somewhat) on the solar events.  Not the best focus, but after three plus hours driving, my eyes weren’t the best.  Also, I forgot to magnify the image on the screen to get a better focus.  That happens when you are rushing.

 

 

Anyway, I also took a movie.  You can see the sunspots change during the minute long film.  All this event lacked was a coronal mass ejection and it would have been a trifecta of infinite proportions.  BTW, the next day there was a spectacular CME.  Oh well, it was still great.

 

 

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

A Different Type of Diamond Ring.

Usually when I am talking about a diamond ring, it is in reference to a solar eclipse.

Image Credit. Alson Wong

The spectacular effect happens twice during the event, and eclipse chasers look for it.  To take pictures like the one above, you need to be very experience.

Chance meeting creates celestial diamond ring

However, the ESO has found a new diamond ring in the sky. In a very rare occurrence, a star, named HD 83535, the Earth and Abell 33, a planetary nebula all aligned to form an image to rival the eclipse’s ring.  This is even more unusual in the fact that Abell 33 is still mostly round.  Most planetary nebula have irregular shapes due to gravitational interaction with the space around them.  So far, Abell 33 is relatively undisturbed.

Abell 33 is the remains of a star similar to our sun that blew off its mass and became a white dwarf star about the size of the Earth.  That means that the star went from being about  1,000,000 times the size of the Earth, to 0.00001% of its former size.  Considering that the star, if similar to our sun, was about 99% of all the mass in the system, a lot of matter was expelled into space.

I think I need to invent the white dwarf diet.  I’d make a killing in the industry.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Blood Moon Rising.

As I said yesterday, April is going to be a busy month.

 

File:Visibility Lunar Eclipse 2014-04-15.png

April 14-15 (depending on where in the world you are Carmen San Diego), a total lunar eclipse will be visible in the Pacific Ocean region, including Australia, as well as North and South America.

Animation april 15 2014 lunar eclipse appearance.gif

It will be the first of two total lunar eclipses in 2014, and the first of a tetrad (four total lunar eclipses in series), the other total eclipses will occur on October 8, April 8, 2015, and September 28, 2015.

Lunar eclipse chart close-2014Apr15.png

Once the Moon is in total eclipse, it looks red.  Hence the name Blood Moon.  However, this is normally how the Moon looks in total eclipse, so it doesn’t have anything to do with the doomsday prophecies running around the Internet.  Unfortunately, April has another doomsday prediction that I will discuss tomorrow.

Astronomy: Roen Kelly

What makes this total eclipse even more event worthy is the fact that Mars will appear right next to the Moon during its eclipse and should be spectacular as Mars is just coming out of its opposition with the Earth.

Time to break out the cameras or cellphone and take some images.  I will try to make some instructions for taking images of the Moon that should help anyone interested.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Partial Lunar Eclipse Tonight.

Tonight’s the night.  You may be able to see a partial eclipse of the Moon, although it may be difficult in the west.

The Moon will pass through part of Earth’s shadow in a penumbral lunar eclipse.  People on the east coast of North and South America will see the entire event, while those of us in the west may see the eclipse in progress.  Still, it is worth trying to looking at.  However, it will probably be more visible in a photograph.

Screen Shot 2013-10-17 at 9.59.55 PM

The people over at awesome astronomy have a guide on how you can use your smartphone to take lunar pictures.

The maximum eclipse will occur at 7:50 p.m. EDT on Friday.  This doesn’t bode well for us in the West, but you never know, you might catch a glimpse of it.  If anyone gets a picture, I would like to see it.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Waiting for the Eclipse Pictures.

So I wasn’t able to attend this years eclipse event in Australia.  Not because I did not want to, but the timing was not the greatest.  Also, the weather potential was in doubt.  An early morning eclipse, rising out of the Pacific Ocean…it sounded spectacular.  Luckily for me, I lent my camera to a friend, Daniel Perry, who is an excellent photographer.  You can check out his images on his web site here.  Hopefully,  he will be sending back some images of the southern skies as well as some great eclipse photos.  Here’s a photo of Daniel at the annular eclipse in Nevada with his welder’s goggles (rated at 14 or higher!!) to look at the eclipse.

 

Everyone in the United States will have to opportunity to see a total or partial eclipse on August 17, 2017.  The map below shows the path of totality.

According to NASA, the eclipse will start at 6:24pm and end about 3 minutes later.  So make your plans now, that is if the world doesn’t end on December 21st, 2012 as predicted by…well a bunch of idiots that have been making money predicting the end of the world for so long now I can’t even begin to tell them all apart.  Sorry, I just sometimes wish people were more interested in helping each other than worrying about some non-event.

Please remember to NEVER LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN WITHOUT PROTECTION, you will damage your eyes.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +

Norman

 

I Need A Shower – Leo Style.

Not only is there a total eclipse of the sun this week, but it is time for the annual leonid meteor shower.  This year is a bit unusual in that the Leonid shower is expected to show two peaks of activity, one on Saturday morning (Nov. 17) and another on Tuesday morning (Nov. 20).

Normally, this meteor shower is one of the more spectacular sights.  But this year the peaks are expected to only produce 10 to 15 meteorites an hour.  Not bad, but last years display was up to 40 per hour.

The meteorites themselves are remnants of comet Tempel-Tuttle that hit the atmosphere as the Earth passes through the dust and debris left behind from the comets last journey through the inner solar system.  It is estimated that 12 or 13 tons of particles are deposited across the entire planet during the annual event.

The map below will show you where to look for the most meteors.  No special equipment is needed, but a nice soft pad to lay back on so that you can gaze upwards and watch the shower.

 

Bundle up and stay warm…bring something warm to drink and enjoy the show.