I Want One!

Canon has developed a 35mm full-frame CMOS image sensor designed for low-light video capture. The 16:9 sensor features a 1920×1080 pixel array.

Each pixel measures 19 x 19 microns.  According to Canon that is 7.5 times larger than the pixels in the EOS-1D X.

The large pixels and low readout-noise circuitry allow the sensor to capture light around 10 times less bright than current CCDs used for astronomy.

Canon is looking into using the sensor in astronomy and medical research.

The sensor can shoot clearly visible video images even in dimly lit environments with as little as 0.03 lux of illumination, or approximately the brightness of a crescent moon—a level of brightness in which it is difficult for the naked eye to perceive objects.

When recording astronomical video an electron-multiplying CCD, which realizes approximately the same level of perception as the naked eye, can capture magnitude-6 stars.  Canon’s new CMOS sensor is capable of recording faint stars with a magnitude of 8.5 and above.

Me Want Now!

Ooooh, the images I could capture with this baby.  My 60DA (which is great) would probably have to be dedicated to outreach programs.

Another toy to make me keep working to support my astronomy habit.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities.  Connect with me on Google +.  If you need help with any patent, trademark, or copyright issue, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation by sending me an email or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

Norman

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